Document Type: Original Research

Authors

1 Department of Physical Therapy, School of Rehabilitation Sciences, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran

2 PhD, Rehabilitation Sciences Research center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran

3 PhD, Neuroscience Laboratory (Brain, Cognition and Behavior), Department of Neuroscience, School of Advanced Medical Science and Technologies, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran

4 PhD, DANA Brain Health Institute, Iranian Neuroscience Society, Fars Chapter, Shiraz, Iran

5 PhD, Academy of Health, Senses Cultural Foundation, Sacramento, CA, USA

6 MSc, Neuroscience Laboratory (Brain, Cognition and Behavior), Department of Neuroscience, School of Advanced Medical Science and Technologies, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran

7 MSc, Rehabilitation Sciences Research center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran

8 PhD, Department of Biostatistics, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran

Abstract

Background: Balance ability is a crucial component of independent daily activities among the older adults. Balance impairment is one of the major risk factors for falls and related complications.
Objective: The present study aims to investigate and compare the effect of neurofeedback training and balance training on balance and fall risk among older adults.
Material and Methods: In this randomized controlled trial, a total of 48 older adults aged more than 65 years were recruited and randomly assigned into two groups, neurofeedback group (n=24) and balance exercise group (n=24). Prior to the intervention, the static balance, dynamic balance, and fall risk were measured using Biodex D balance system and Fullerton Advanced Balance scale. Subjects in neurofeedback group received neurofeedback training for 12 sessions of 30-min, every other day. Moreover, subjects in balance exercise group received balance training for four weeks in 12 sessions (45-minute) every other day. After the intervention, balance measurements were repeated in both groups. The significance level was set at p Results: Static balance and dynamic balance were shown to significantly improve, after the interventions (p <0.001). Furthermore, fall risk was significantly reduced, after the trial (p <0.001). In addition, the therapeutic effect of neurofeedback training was not less significant than exercises on balance in the older adults (p <0.001).
Conclusion: The findings suggest that both neurofeedback training and balance training improved balance ability among the older adults. Results also show the therapeutic effect of neurofeedback training on balance in older people. However, further research is required to accurately investigate the long-term effects of these two treatment methods among the older adults.

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